Archive for January, 2018

From The Rabbi – Parshat Shmot 5778

This week we are introduced to the most famous character of all Jewish history – Moshe (Moses), the redeemer of the Jewish people from Egypt and the transmitter of Torah from Hashem.

The mystery of Moses lies in his name: Though he was named by his biological parents, he is known by the name Moses – Moshe – given to him by Pharaoh’s daughter. Moses’ mother, to save him from Pharaoh’s decree that all newborn Jewish males be drowned in the Nile, placed her three-month-old infant in a basket and concealed it in the rushes that grew along the Nile riverbank. Pharaoh’s daughter discovered the weeping child when she went to bathe in the river.

She therefore named the child Moshe (“the drawn one”), “because I have drawn him from the water” (Exodus 2:10).

Why would the great Moses be known by this strange name based on this seemingly incidental episode? The name Moses actually captures the essence of his personality: A man drawn from water.

Water is a mysterious world. Unlike land where the terrain and the creatures are visible, the contours of the sea and all its inhabitants remain submerged and concealed in an unknown universe. This distinction is not merely quantitative. The fish in the sea are dependent and connected to their very source of sustenance, while land mammals remain separate from their source; their psyches are disconnected from their life source.

The mystics explain that Moses was a “man of no words” because his soul originated from the “hidden worlds” of water, the intimate world of the unconscious, which is more profound and intense than any words of land can express. But for this exact reason Moses introduced unprecedented revelation to Earth. Precisely because Moses is a “water man” living on Earth, he is able to draw from the inner worlds and bridge and express the language of the Divine and communicate it to the land people.

The Zohar teaches that there are tzaddikim (righteous individuals) who live their entire lives as “fishes of the sea,” wholly submerged within a perpetual awareness of and subjugation to the divine reality. Moses was the epitome of these “aquatic souls.” “Moses was the most humble man on the face of the earth.” He was certainly aware of his own greatness; certainly he knew that he was the single human being chosen by G-d to serve as the conveyor of the Divine wisdom and will to the human race. Yet Moses did not view his qualities as his “own” attainments, for he had utterly nullified and submerged his self within the sea of the divine reality. His own life was merely the divine plan being realized through a transparent channel; his teachings – the “Divine presence speaking from his throat.”

And that is why Moses was actually hidden in the water, and is consistently identified with water.

Thus Moses was an embodiment of paradox and contradictions. Drawn from water, Moses bridged two opposite worlds – the unconscious and the conscious, the world of spirit and the world of matter, the Divine and the human.

Outside of this world, Moses was able to transform this world and build the Holy Temple, a material home for the Divine, where “I will rest amongst you.”

Though Moses is the most famous person in history, he always remains a mystery – seemingly more at home in his 40 days in the clouds of Sinai than in his days on Earth. Even after death – by the kiss of G-d – Moses’ burial place remains unknown: “Below it appeared as though he was above and above it appeared as though he was below.”

Therein lays the secret of the enigmatic Moses: Moses was a “man of G-d.” To be a man and to be Divine is the ultimate paradox.

So, the next time you encounter a paradox in your own life or in the world around you – remember,  that paradox maybe the most natural state of a universe not fully in touch with its own essence.

I avail of myself of this opportunity to commend and say Kol Hakavod! to all our committed members and friends,who regularly attend services at the Brisbane Syangogue, during the week and on Shabbat, particularly in the current heat. You are an inspiration to us all!

As many members are away for the holiday season, please make a special effort to attend services so that we are able to maintain the Minyan, both on Shabbat and during the week.

Shabbat Shalom, 

Rabbi Levi and Dvorah Jaffe

Shabbat and Festival Times

 

Fri  July 6th: Light Candles 4.49pm
Shabbat ends: Sat 7th 5.45pm

Fri  July 13th: Light Candles 4.52pm
Shabbat ends: Sat 14th 5.47pm

Fri  July 20th: Light Candles 4.55pm
Shabbat ends: Sat 21st 5.51pm
Tisha B’Av Fast 5.14pm ends Sun 22nd 5.40pm

Fri  July 27th: Light Candles 4.59pm
Shabbat ends: Sat 28th 5.54pm

Fri  August 3rd: Light Candles 5.02pm
Shabbat ends: Sat 4th 5.57pm

Fri  August 10th: Light Candles 5.06pm
Shabbat ends: Sat 11th 6pm

Fri  August 17th: Light Candles 5.09pm
Shabbat ends: Sat 18th 6.03pm

Fri  August 24th: Light Candles 5.13pm
Shabbat ends: Sat 25th 6.06pm

Fri  August 31st: Light Candles 5.16pm
Shabbat ends: Sat Sept 1 6.09pm