Archive for December, 2018

From The Rabbi – Parshat Shemot 5779

The book of Shemot, which we begin reading this week, reminds us of a key ingredient to our nation’s survival.

The word “shemot” means names. There were three things that were critical to preserving the Jewish people’s identity during their bondage in Egypt. They maintained their; language, their mode of dress and their Jewish names.

All Jews should have Jewish names, either given by their parents as newborns, or in some cases, chosen themselves later in life. A Jewish name reflects your Jewish soul and it is something you should be proud of.

So, if you have a Jewish name, why not start using it more frequently.

If you do not have a Jewish name, it is never too late to adopt one and we will be only too happy to assist in this regard.

While this is  always a peaceful time of year, we often struggle to secure Minyanim at Shul. If you are in town and able to join us at Shul, on Shabbat or during the week, please do so as one or two extra people can  make all the difference.

For those of you will be heading off for a well-deserved summer break, I encourage you to consider adding a depth to your summer holiday and bring a meaningful Jewish book, Siddur, Tefillin and/or traveling Shabbat candles along with you. Slowing down is so necessary and offers the opportunity for spiritual growth.

Shabbat Shalom we look forward to see you at Shul.

Levi and Dvorah Jaffe

From The Rabbi – Parshat Vayechi 5779

From time time its nice to receive surprises. Well, this week I visited one of our esteemed congregants and, as usual, I brought along my Tefillin so that we could preform a Mitzvah together. The congregant, seeing the Tefillin on the table, said to me “Hey, Rabbi I see you brought the Tefillin, now you would not want me putting them on twice in one day would you?”. I was pleasantly surprised to hear from this dear congregant that, for the past few months, he has begun donning the Tefillin each morning (except Shabbat). Kol Hakavod! and may others follow this fine example of Yiddisher commitment, which inspired me and is a great source of blessing.     

On the topic of blessings, it is a custom among many Jewish parents to bless their children each Friday evening at the onset of Shabbat, prior to the recital of the kiddush. The opening blessing for boys is “May G-d make you like Ephraim and like Menasheh” Why are these two boys, who were the grandchildren of Jacob, chosen over Jacobs actual children, or the Patriarchs, to become the model and symbol we wish our children to emulate?

As we know, throughout Jewish history, there have been many periods of exile and unceasing struggles against foreign cultures. Growing up in Egypt, a culture by diametrically opposed to their own, Ephraim and Menasheh still managed to hold on to their independent Jewish culture and traditions. The sons of the vizier, who grew up in the Egyptian palace, remained Jacob’s grandchildren.

Jacob blesses all his children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and all future generations that we should emulate the example of Ephraim and Menasheh, in maintaining our Jewish identity, regardless of how strong and enticing the influences of our environment may be.

With the increasing temperatures and the holiday season approaching, Brisbane, and particularly the CBD, is becoming very quiet and will become even quieter over the next couple of weeks.

While this is  always a peaceful time of year, we often struggle to secure Minyanim at Shul. If you are in town and able to join us at Shul, on Shabbat or during the week, please do so as one or two extra people can sometimes make all the difference.

For those of you will be heading off for a well-deserved summer break. I encourage you to consider adding a depth to your summer holiday and bring a meaningful Jewish book, Siddur, Tefillin and/or travelling Shabbat candles along with you. Slowing down is so necessary and offers the opportunity for spiritual growth.

Shabbat Shalom we look forward to seeing you at Shul.

Levi and Dvorah Jaffe

Candle Lighting Times Brisbane

 

 

Fri Sept 3rd: Light Candles 5.17pm
Shabbat ends: Sat 4th 6.11pm

Monday Sept 6th: Erev Rosh Hashana Light Candles 5.19pm

Tuesday Sept 7th: Rosh Hashana 1 Light Candles after 6.12pm

Wed Sept 8th: Rosh Hashana 2 Yom Tov ends 6.12pm

Thurs Sept 9th: Fast of Gedaliah: 4.40am-6.02pm

Fri Sept 10th: Light Candles 5.21pm
Shabbat ends: Sat 11th 6.14pm

Wed Sept 15th: Erev Yom Kippur – Kol Nidrei Night Light Candles 5.23pm

Thurs Sept 16th: Yom Kippur   Yom Kippur ends 6.16pm

Fri Sept 17th: Light Candles 5.24pm
Shabbat ends: Sat 18th 6.17pm

Mon Sept 20th: Erev Sukkot  Light Candles 5.25pm

Tues Sept 21st: Sukkot 1  Light Candles after 6.18pm

Wed Sept 22nd: Sukkot 2  Yom Tov ends 6.19pm

Thurs Sept 23rd – Sunday 26th: Sukkot intermediate days (Chol Hamoed)

Monday Sept 27th: Hoshana Rabba    Light Candles 5.28pm

Tuesday Sept 28th: Shemini Atzeret: Light Candles after 6.21pm

Wed Sept 29th: Simchat Torah   Yom Tov ends 6.22pm